Giving my loco the rustic treatment

I recently purchased a second-hand On30 Bachmann porter 2-4-0 loco for my narrow gauge wall layout, (which I plan to build over the next few months). The other day I set about repainting the loco because I was not comfortable with the weathering.

Well tonight I spent some time giving the loco a rustic overhaul.

I began by dabbing on some rust effect using a Humbrol Rust Wash, placing a fair bit on and then rubbing it back. The wash worked really well on the metal boiler. Was a little more difficult to get the desired effect on the plastic frontage. Next I ran some Humbrol white wash down the side of the boiler and then rubbed this back to get a leached effect.

I was not happy with the plastic cabin (not rustic enough for my liking), so I removed it and then set about building my own cabin out of matchstick wood and PVA glue. I tried to match the cabin to exactly the same size as the plastic cabin, and managed to get it fairly accurate. I placed some diagonal supports between the roof struts to strengthen the structure. I was unsure whether to go with an iron roof or keep it timber. I chose timber this time. For my next narrow gauge loco I will go with an iron roof. Below shows the completed cabin sitting next to the plastic original.

 

Rear wooden buffer in place.
Rear wooden buffer in place.

I stained the cabin with Citadel Agrax Earthsade wash. It is a dark brown wash which seeps into the wood giving it a great rustic finish.

With the cabin in place I then set about creating a similar effect for the front buffer, ensuring the coupling could still move freely and be easily replaced in the future. Below you can see that the chimney still needs weathering and the iron plate below the buffer needs some work.

 

Threw an axe and keg with a mug on front. Hung a chain on the right side.
Threw an axe and keg with a mug on front. Hung a chain on the right side.

With the front buffer completed I then created a similar rear buffer, ensuring once again that the coupling could still move freely and be replaced easily in the future. I then positioned the whistle on the roof.

Next I weathered up the lower portion of the chimney stack, then added an axe and a roped keg (with drinking mug) to the front buffer. With these in place I then hung a think chain on the right hand side from the cabin roof.

Below is a close up of the roped keg and drinking mug. Both the axe and keg I obtained from an old Warhammer Fantasy sprue. They are not to scale but incredibly close. I think they look the part.

Close up of the roped keg and mug.
Close up of the roped keg and mug.

Next I added some weathering to the inside of the cabin. In this photo you can see the bell rope coming in on the left hand side through the firewall.

Inside the cabin.
Inside the cabin.

A full photo of the right had side. Very fond of the axe wedged into the front buffer. If anything the chain is slightly too big. Might replace with smaller links in the future.

Right side shot. Loco is on its way to rustic.
Right side shot. Loco is on its way to rustic.

A view of the left hand side. I also looped a chain from the cabin roof on this side and then added the bell pull rope.

Strung a pull rope for the bell.
Strung a pull rope for the bell.

I’m not finished yet. There is still plenty to do, such as weathering the wheels and pistons, adding a driver and some kindling to the cabin, weathering the top of the chimney stack and adding some further weathering to the rear metal and cabin floor. I’d also like to rework the rust effect on the rear and add some weathering to the iron plates beneath the buffers. There are a few more gadgets I have ready to place on the loco too. More to come.

Happy modelling.

 

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